In conversation, too is used after a word or phrase when you are making a brief comment on something that has just been said. You say 'These boots are too big'. All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. You usually put too at the end of a clause. So can also refer forward to a result clause introduced by that. However, too is sometimes used with an adjective in front of a noun in formal or literary English. Don't say 'This is a too complex problem to be dealt with here'.

You can use much too much or far too much with an uncountable noun to say that there is very much more of something than is necessary or desirable.

You use too as an adverb to show that what has just been said applies to or includes someone or something else. High quality example sentences with “they too are” in context from reliable sources - Ludwig is the linguistic search engine that helps you to write better in English

You can use too much with an uncountable noun to say that there is more of something than is needed or wanted. If there is no auxiliary verb, you put also immediately in front of the verb, unless the verb is be. Too is sometimes put after the first noun phrase in a clause. However, you don't usually use 'too' in front of an adjective or adverb simply to emphasize it.

Don't say, for example, 'I am too pleased with my new car'. It’s writing that creates problems. As well always goes at the end of a clause.

'They've finished mending the road.' – 'About time, too!' You use too in front of an adjective or adverb to say that an amount or degree of a quality is more than is needed or wanted.

Don't use 'very' in front of too.

Also is sometimes put at the beginning of a clause. Depression may be expressed physically too. "Too" is used less frequently than "to," so if you know what "too" means, then you can use it just for those specific meanings. If there is more than one auxiliary verb, you put also after the first one. It’s writing that creates problems. If there is an auxiliary verb, you put also after the auxiliary verb. Be Careful!Don't use 'fairly', 'quite', or 'pretty' in front of too. But there’s an easy way to make sure you’re using the correct word. You can also say that there is too little of something. Learning the difference between the two words can help you choose the correct spelling when you are writing. Don't say, for example, 'The hat was very too small for her'. Don't say, for example, 'It's too much hot to play football'. You can feel confident that when "too" is not appropriate, "to" is the right choice. I wondered whether I too would become ill. The word you use is very. Say 'It's too hot to play football' or 'It's much too hot to play football'. You can use far too many with a countable noun to say that there is a much larger number of people or things than is necessary or desirable. Focus on "too" first. Some people use too in front of words like kind to say how grateful they are. So, very, and too can all be used to intensify the meaning of an adjective, an adverb, or a word like much or many.

Don't put too at the beginning of a sentence. too sick to travel; too suprised for words.

You don't usually use 'also', 'too', or 'as well' in negative clauses. You use also, too, or as well when you are giving more information about something. Very is a simple intensifier, without any other meaning. A or an is put after the adjective. You can also say that there are too few people or things. If the verb is be, you put also after it. You don't normally use too with an adjective in front of a noun. You can use too many with a countable noun to say that there are more people or things than are needed or wanted. Too can be used with a to-infinitive or with for to say that a particular result does not or cannot happen. Too is sometimes put after the first noun phrase in a clause. Be Careful!Don't put also at the end of a clause. You can use rather, slightly, or a bit in front of too. However, 'I too am an American' can only mean 'Like the person just mentioned, I am an American'. هم، همداسې: ډېر، خوار ډېر، بې كچه، دومره ډېر چې دپښېمانۍ وړوى, Dictionary, Encyclopedia and Thesaurus - The Free Dictionary, هَذِهِ الغُرْفَةُ بارِدَةٌ أَكْثَرُ مِنْ اللازِمِ, الطَعَامُ مُتَبَّلٌ أَكْثَرُ مِنْ اللازِمِ, كُنْتَ تَقودُ السَيَّارَةَ بِسُرْعَةٍ كَبِيرَةٍٍ, Usted iba conduciendo a demasiada velocidad, كانَ يقودُ السَيَّارَةَ بِسُرْعَةٍ كَبيرَةٍ, the webmaster's page for free fun content.

This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional. Too suggests an excessive or undesirable amount. This is a too complex problem to be dealt with here. Nous avons appris à lire, et rapidement en plus. Since they are pronounced the same, you don’t have to worry about mixing up to and too in speech. Be Careful!Don't use too much or much too much in front of an adjective which is not followed by a noun.

Don't say, for example, 'These are too big boots'. For example, you can say 'This is too complex a problem to be dealt with here'. So can suggest an emotion in the speaker, such as pleasure, surprise, or disappointment. This is fairly formal. Don't say that there are 'much too many' of them. You say 'I'm not hungry and she's not hungry either', 'I'm not hungry and neither is she', or 'I'm not hungry and nor is she'. Say 'The hat was much too small for her' or 'The hat was far too small for her'. Also is usually used in front of a verb. The homophones "to" and "too" can be commonly mistaken. Too can be an adverb or a grading adverb.

However, the position of too can make a difference to the meaning of a sentence.